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Newhouse unable to parlay lucky start at WSOP final table, finishes ninth

5 November 2013

LAS VEGAS -- Mark Newhouse almost had one of the shortest November Nine experiences in history. On the fifth hand of the World Series of Poker's final table, Newhouse, the second-shortest stack at the table, moved all in over the top of Marc-Etienne's opening raise holding pocket queens. Unfortunately for Newhouse, McLaughlin called and showed pocked kings.

But there was a queen in the window on the flop, which put Newhouse in the lead in the hand and back in the tournament.

"I got lucky, but there really wasn't any other way that hand could go," said Newhouse.

The good luck was just a brief pardon, however, as Newhouse busted out of the tournament in ninth place, 31 hands later, when his pocket nines lost to Ryan Riess's ace-king when a king fell on the flop.

"I tried not to have great expectations," Newhouse said of his final table experience. "I just came in to play the best poker I could play."

With Newhouse's short stack (he entered play with less than 20 big blinds), he didn't have many options. He only played five hands and wasn't able to parlay his double up into a deeper run at the final table.

That is not joy on the face of Mark Newhouse.

That is not joy on the face of Mark Newhouse. (photo by Vin Narayanan, Casino City)

"I'm happy to have made it this far, and hopefully I'll do it again next year," said Newhouse. "In 2014, we need to do better than ninth."

Newhouse won $733,224, which was paid to him when he made the final table in July.
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Best of Aaron Todd
Aaron Todd

Home-game hotshot Aaron Todd was an editor/writer at Casino City for nearly eight years, and is currently the Assistant Director of Athletics for Communications and Marketing at St. Lawrence University, his alma mater. While he is happy to play Texas Hold'em, he'd rather mix it up and play Omaha Hi/Lo, Razz, Deuce-to-Seven Triple Draw, and Badugi.

Aaron Todd

Home-game hotshot Aaron Todd was an editor/writer at Casino City for nearly eight years, and is currently the Assistant Director of Athletics for Communications and Marketing at St. Lawrence University, his alma mater. While he is happy to play Texas Hold'em, he'd rather mix it up and play Omaha Hi/Lo, Razz, Deuce-to-Seven Triple Draw, and Badugi.